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"Comms planning’s drive for greater engagement has translated into placing increasing demands on the audience – just as people’s benign acquiescence towards marketing is being undermined by the total transparency and default cynicism of the connected era."

- The Future of Comms Planning has to balance the increasing brand desire for “engagement” with consumer disinterest
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"Perhaps if we all thought of ourselves in the business of creating connections – in the mind, between people, companies and brands, and between people and other people – then we’d find ourselves better adapted to the new environments and possibilities of our age. In an age defined by its connectedness – people to people, people to things, and things to other things – that seems a far more accurate and useful perspective on what we all do."

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Low fidelity data mining for planners, from Planning-ness 2014

Data for interestingness for planners

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explore-blog:

Alan Watts on hurrying vs. timing

capitalism problems

Source: explore-blog
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Daycation - noun - a single day vacation.

This is a hashtag busy young people are using when they take a single day off and try to make the most of it. For example, an Instagram photo of a day beach trip would include #daycation

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"The people LEAST likely to engage deeply are the MOST important for growth.

There is a way out of this paradox. But it requires us to embrace two principles:

1) Battle for interest, not attention
2)Fans are actors, not the audience"

- The Participation Paradox by Martin Weigel (via re-brand)
Source: hum4nbehavi0r
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What If Katniss Didn't Have to Choose Between Peeta and Gale?

Gender and queer theory and Hunger Games. We act gender in relationships - it isn’t the parts we have but the roles we take. Smart stuff.

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XBox congratulates Playstation on the launch

Bravo - what a great, consumer-centric approach to competition. Knowing your audience loves both consoles and you have XBox One coming out, why take a jab? Well done.

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newyorker:

Ian Crouch explains the “no-collar” Millennial crime of borrowing access to Netflix, Spotify, and other digital entertainment: http://nyr.kr/1b7s0oY

“When we do buy something, we flush with the thrill of children playing dress-up with their parents’ clothes. What’s an even better feeling? When we can, as we might say, pay it forward, and share our largesse. Like a proud papa, I log into the Netflix account that I actually pay for and see some strange documentary on my recently watched list.”

llustration by Roman Muradov.

Sharing isn’t stealing according to some

Source: newyorker.com